About us

The Electoral Boundaries Commission (EBC) is an independent, neutral statutory body. It’s our job to establish and review Victoria’s electoral boundaries.

We make sure each electorate has a similar number of enrolled voters so that when it’s time to vote in a State election, each vote carries equal weight. This is known as the ‘one vote, one value’ principle.

To make sure the number of enrolled voters in each electorate remains approximately the same over time, we review electoral boundaries regularly and adjust them when needed. The process of reviewing electoral boundaries is called a ‘redivision’.

The Victorian Electoral Commission (VEC) has legislated responsibility for supporting electoral representation processes for the EBC; As such, it provides technical and administrative support. The VEC is also required to promote public awareness and understanding of electoral issues. You should be aware that any information you provide to the EBC will be shared with the VEC.

Electoral Boundaries Commission members

Our members:

  • Chief Judge of the County Court, His Honour Chief Judge Peter Kidd SC (EBC Chairperson)
  • Electoral Commissioner, Mr Warwick Gately AM
  • Surveyor-General of Victoria, Mr Craig Sandy.

We’re supported by our secretary Dr Paul Thornton-Smith, with administrative and technical support provided by the Victorian Electoral Commission.

Independent and impartial

The Electoral Boundaries Commission Act 1982 (the Act) authorises the function of the EBC, its members and the conditions under which a redivision takes place.

The Act stipulates that the EBC consists of three independent members: the current Chief Judge of the County Court, the current Electoral Commissioner, and the current Surveyor-General.

The EBC doesn’t report to a minister or to the government of the day, but carries out a redivision in accordance with the Act. The electoral boundaries determined by the EBC are final and cannot be rejected or altered by the government or parliament. This is to ensure that electoral boundaries cannot be determined in the interests of the government or any political parties.