About redivisions

A redivision is a consultative process and we invite submissions from all members of the public, political parties and other stakeholders.

The purpose of a redivision is to make sure each of Victoria’s regions and districts have about the same number of enrolled voters. We also consider:

  • the area and its physical features
  • any means of communication and travel
  • community interests, including economic, social and regional interests
  • demographic trends.

During a redivision there are opportunities to have a say on the proposed boundaries and electorate names. Public consultation generally happens in two stages:

  • stage one submissions
  • stage two submissions.

The Electoral Boundaries Commission Act 1982 sets out the conditions under which a redivision takes place and provides the framework, process and timetable for a redivision.

What triggers a redivision?

Victoria’s electoral boundaries must be reviewed and adjusted if in the 18 to 24 months before a scheduled State election:

  • there have been two State elections since the last redivision
  • voter enrolment in more than 30% of electoral districts or regions differs from the average by over 10% for more than two months, or
  • voter enrolment in more than one-quarter of electoral districts or regions differs from the average by over 10% for more than two months, and voter enrolment in more than 5% of districts or regions differs from the average by over 20% for more than two months, or
  • the number of districts or regions changes.

The last redivision was in 2013, with the resulting electoral boundaries in place for the 2014 and 2018 State elections. We’re now required to conduct a redivision for the 2022 State election.

Learn more

The State electoral boundaries determined in this redivision will take effect when the writ for the 2022 State election is issued on 1 November 2022.

The quota

We use quotas to work out how many enrolled voters should be in each district and region. We calculate quotas at the very start of a redivision to give us a snapshot of enrolled voters in Victoria.

Victoria has two quotas: district and region.

To find the district quota, we divide the total number of enrolled voters in Victoria by the number of districts (88).

To find the region quota, we divide the total number of enrolled voters in Victoria by the number of regions (8).

To ensure equal representation in Parliament, the number of enrolled voters in each district and region must not vary by more than 10% (up or down) from the quota.

When a boundary redivision is happening, we publish the quotas and electoral data to help people make a submission.

Electoral boundaries

Victoria has 88 districts and eight regions.

Each district is represented by one Member of Parliament in Victoria’s Legislative Assembly, also known as the Lower House.

Each region is represented by five Members of Parliament in Victoria’s Legislative Council, also known as the Upper House.

Get to know the district and region boundaries on our interactive map.

Go to interactive map